1575 What Happens When We Die? Part 2

What happens when we die? Finish the 2-part series.

ROBERT >> Thank you for joining us today on The Truth In Love as we continue to discover how the Bible answers an often asked and a very interesting question: What happens when we die?

This question presupposes that we will die, as the Bible says in Hebrews 9:27, It is appointed unto man once to die, and after that the judgment. Unless we live until the Lord comes again, we will all die. This is an obvious and undeniable fact of life; and thus, this is a question that ought to be of concern to us all. So let’s see what the Bible says about what happens when we die. Stay tuned. We’ll be back in just a moment.

Singing>> Speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth in love.

ROBERT >> Before we continue in our lesson today, I want to review some of the things that we’ve already learned about what happens when we die.

First of all, we have noticed that our body is separated from our spirit. At death, there is a separation. In fact, the word death means separation. Physical death is separation of the body from the spirit.

James 2:26, the Bible says, For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. So the body without the spirit is dead. That’s physical death.

Spiritual death is separation of man from God, as we read of in Isaiah 59:1-2. But in this lesson, we’re concerned about physical death. What happens when we die? Our body is separated from our spirit.

But secondly, we also learned that our body returns to the earth, and our spirit to God. Then the dust will return to the earth as it was, and the spirit will return to God who gave it, Ecclesiastes 12:7.

You remember how man was made from the dust of the earth, Genesis 2:7? When he dies, his body will return to that dust of the earth. But the spirit of man, made in the image of God, will return to God.

And then thirdly, we also noticed that we have no more involvement with life on the earth. You see, being dead, our spirit leaving our body and returning to God, we’ll know nothing more about what’s going on here on the earth. We’ll never more share in anything under the sun, as we read in Ecclesiastes 9:5-6 and in verse 10. Now, this doesn’t mean that we’re unconscious in death, but that we have no involvement with life on the earth.

Fourthly, we also learned that upon death, we are in Hades. Hades literally means unseen. It’s used of the dwelling place of the spirits of the dead. For some, Hades is a place of torment; and for some, it is a place of comfort. When the rich man died in Jesus’ parable in Luke chapter 16, we see that he was in torment in Hades, verse 23.

When Jesus died, he was in Hades; but he was not left there. He was raised from the dead according to Acts 2:27 and verse 31. Jesus was not in torment, but he was in Paradise. You remember the thief who died on the cross next to him in Luke 23:43. To him Jesus promised that they would both be in Paradise that day upon their death.

Paradise is an oriental word that speaks of a beautiful garden like the Garden of Eden we read about in Genesis the 2nd chapter. The faithful are promised the tree of life in Paradise according to Revelation 2:7. It is the third heaven according to what the apostle Paul wrote in 2 Corinthians 12:2-4.

You see, the Bible speaks of three heavens. We learned last week that there is the earth’s atmosphere, the sky where the birds fly you read about in Genesis 1:20 as well as verses 6 through 8 of that chapter; there’s also the second heaven, or outer space, where the sun and the moon and the stars reside, Genesis 1:16-17; but then there is the third heaven, God’s dwelling place that we read about in passages like 1 Kings 8:30.

You might remember how the apostle Paul said that, We are confident, yes, well pleased rather to be absent from the body and to be present with the Lord, 2 Corinthians 5:8.

The apostle Paul desired to depart, to depart from this life, from this earth, from this world, and to be with Christ, Philippians 1:23.

Now today we want to learn some more about what happens when we die. And I want to draw your attention back to the parable of Jesus in Luke chapter 16, where we read about the death of Lazarus the beggar and also the rich man before whose gate he begged. And we notice in Luke chapter 16 that when Lazarus died, he was carried by angels to Abraham’s bosom.

Here in Luke 16:22 we read, So it was that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s bosom. The rich man also died and was buried. Abraham’s bosom was a place of comfort. Here, Lazarus was comforted. Look in Luke 16:25. But Abraham said, Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things; but now he is comforted and you are tormented.

Lazarus found himself in Abraham’s bosom, in a place of comfort. Remember, Abraham was the father of the faithful. And so you see Lazarus’s association now with the faithful. Remember that God promised blessing through Abraham and rest to all who die in the Lord, Revelation 14:13.

Those who were slain for the word of God, we read in Revelation 6:11, would find rest on the other side of death. But let’s go a little bit further with our lesson today. Let’s notice that in death, our destiny is sealed. There was a great gulf fixed between the rich man, who found himself in torment, and Lazarus, who found himself in comfort. There was a great gulf that could not be passed.

Read with me in Luke 16:26. Jesus says, And besides all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed, so that those who want to pass from here to you cannot; nor can those from there pass to us.

We see here from this passage that once we die, there is nothing that can be done to alter our destiny. If you’re in comfort, you will continue in comfort. If you’re in torment, it will do no good for anyone to be baptized for you or to try to pray you out of torment. No one will be able to beg or to borrow their way out of torment. We’ll be judged by what we’ve done in the body.

Let me read this passage to you from 2 Corinthians 5:10. The apostle Paul reminds us that a judgment day is coming. And I want you to notice the basis of judgment here. 2 Corinthians 5:10, Paul writes, For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive the things done in the body, according to what he has done, whether good or bad.

You see, one day we’ll be judged by Christ. We won’t be judged by what happens to us after we die; we’ll be judged by the life that we lived while in this body upon this earth.

Still there’s another point that we need to notice today, and that’s simply this: That in death, we maintain our personal identity. That is, we’re able to recognize one another, even those that we’ve never met. Robert is always going to be Robert. When Robert dies, he’ll still be Robert. And that’s true with each and every one of you. You’ll never lose that personal identity that you now have. Let’s notice this again in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus here in Luke chapter 16. Lazarus, you remember, was carried to Abraham’s bosom. And the rich man, you remember, was in Hades in torment. But look at verse 22 and verse 23 of Luke 16.

So it was that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s bosom. The rich man also died and was buried. And being in torments in Hades, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.

You see here even after death, now he was in the torments of Hades. Still he could see Abraham. He recognized Abraham. He knew who Abraham was. And the same thing was true about that beggar that he’d known for a long time upon the earth. On the other side of death, Lazarus was still Lazarus, Abraham was still Abraham, and the rich man was still the rich man.

The Bible tells us in another place, in Genesis 25:8, that when Abraham died, he was gathered to his people. Now, think about that for just a moment. What meaning would that have if they didn’t know each other? That would be meaningless if they could not know each other on the other side of death. But the fact that Abraham could go on and be with his people, he would recognize them, he would know them, they would know him, makes all the sense in the world.

Another passage, in 2 Samuel 12:23. You might remember King David and his adultery with Bathsheba and how that out of that union came a son; but that son became very ill until he died. And upon his death, David made this statement: I shall go to him, but he shall not return to me. Again, this would be meaningless if David could not know him. David looked forward to that day when he would be able to go on the other side of death and he could join there this child who he never got to know on this earth. He would know that child, the child would know him on the other side of death.

Still there’s another point that we need to consider concerning what happens when we die. Not only will we be able to recognize and to know one another, will we keep our personal identity, but we can communicate with one another on the other side of death.

Let’s go again to Luke the 16th chapter, and let’s read verses 24 through 31. Then he cried and said, Father Abraham, how have mercy on me, and send Lazarus that he may dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. Here you see the rich man calling out to Abraham. And they were carrying on a conversation with each other. Abraham responded. Look in verse 25. But Abraham said, Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, and Lazarus evil things; but now he is comforted and you are tormented. And besides all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed, so that those who want to pass from here to you cannot, nor can those from there pass to us. And then he said, I beg you, therefore, father, that you would send him to my father’s house, for I have five brothers, that he may testify to them, lest they also come to this place of torment. Abraham said to him, They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them. And he said, No, father Abraham; but if one goes to them from the dead, they will repent. But he said to him, If they did not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded though one rise from the dead.

You see how this conversation continued on between the rich man and Abraham, the rich man being in torment, Abraham on the other side of that great gulf that had been fixed between them? And still they were able to communicate with one another.

Now, here we see them using words, we see them talking to one another. I don’t know how spirits communicate on the other side of death, but this is how God relayed that to us, to help us to know that we will be able to in fact communicate with one another. That’s what happens when we die.

Something else we need to notice here, and that is that we’re going to have feeling, or sensibility, when we die. Just because you die doesn’t mean that you have no more feeling. You remember the rich man was where? In torment. In fact, he was hurting so much, he desired his tongue to be cooled because he was tormented by the flame, verse 24. On the other hand, here’s Lazarus on the other side of the great gulf that’s fixed, and he was in comfort in Abraham’s bosom. And so we speak here about the feeling of pain and the feeling of comfort, that sensitivity is there on the other side of death. Again, he speaks to us in physical terms that we understand, that we relate to. How a spirit feels torment and feels comfort, we don’t understand all about that; but it’s clear that some are going to feel pain, that they will hurt, that it will be a tormenting type of existence. On the other hand, there will be those that will be comforted, they’ll be at peace, at rest like Lazarus.

There is a final thing that I want to bring to your attention today. You probably already noticed it in our reading here in Luke 16. And that is when we die, we possess memory of our past life on earth.

Now, we already mentioned that we have no more involvement with the life here on the earth; that is, we don’t know what’s going on, we don’t see what’s going on, we don’t communicate back and forth with those upon the earth. We have no more involvement according to Ecclesiastes; but we do have a memory of our past life here on the earth. And that’s made abundantly clear in the reading here in Luke chapter 16.

Let me look again with you in verse 25. In Luke 16:25, But Abraham said, Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things; but now he is comforted and you are tormented.

Abraham told the rich man, look, remember, remember what it was like. Remember the good things that you had in the past life? Remember Lazarus, the evil things that he had in his lifetime on earth? Do you remember those things? And of course he did. In fact, he not only remembered that, but he also remembered his father’s house and his five brothers.

Read again with me verses 27 and 28. Then he said, I beg you therefore, father, that you would send him to my father’s house, for I have five brothers, that he may testify to them, lest they also come to this place of torment. Recognize that when we die, we will remember our past life upon the earth. We see this not only here in the parable, but we also see it in the Revelation in the vision of John in Revelation chapter 6. And I want to go there with you this morning and read, because I want you to see a number of things from this passage.

In Revelation the 6th chapter, John has a vision of souls that had been slain for the word of God. These are those who have been persecuted and tortured and had died for the cause of Jesus Christ. And they’re waiting for the Lord to avenge their blood on those who dwell on the earth. And so they cry out to him here in this vision.

Revelation chapter 6, and let’s pick it up here in verse 9. When He opened the fifth seal, I saw under the altar the souls of those who had been slain for the word of God and for the testimony which they held.

You see, John was able to see into the heavenly realm, see into Hades, see into that place of Paradise, Abraham’s bosom, that place of comfort. And what did he see there? He saw the souls of those who had been put to death for their faith in Jesus Christ.

Now let’s read a little bit further and notice some more things about that. In verse 10, And they cried out with a loud voice, saying, How long, O Lord, holy and true, until You judge and avenge our blood on those who dwell on the earth? You see, not only was John able to see these souls, they had their personal identity, he knew who they were, but they were also able to communicate. And here you see them talking out to the Lord for vengeance upon their enemies.

And then further, in verse 11, Then a white robe was given to each of them; and it was said to them that they should rest a little while longer, until both the number of their fellow servants and their brethren, who would be killed as they were, was completed. Here we see that those who had died for the cause of Christ would now find themselves in rest on the other side of death. They were waiting there until God would render vengeance upon their enemies.

We see in this vision of John how they recognized each other, how they knew each other, how they kept their personal identity, how they communicated with one another on the other side of death, and how they remembered their past and what had happened to them here upon this earth.

So now having looked at all of these things about what happens when we die, surely we can see that we can better able put things in proper perspective, to realize that this life is not all there is; that when we die, we’re not dead all over like Rover, as we sometimes say, but our spirits will live on and on. We may live in torment, or we may live in comfort; but there is nothing we can do about it after we die. No, now is the time to prepare for life after death.

What about you? If you were to die today, would you go to heaven?

Well, there’s only one way that we can know that, and that’s through Jesus Christ our Lord and our savior. Jesus himself said in John 14:6, I am the way, the truth, and the life, and no one comes unto the Father but by Me.

Peter said in Acts 4:12 that, There is no other name under heaven given among men whereby we must be saved. Salvation from our sins and the hope of eternal life with God is totally dependent upon that one, that perfect one, our Lord and savior, Jesus Christ; because you see, it was at the cross, in his death, in the shedding of his blood that he paid for the price of our sins.

As Peter said in 1 Peter 1:18, You’re redeemed with the precious blood of Christ. And the hope, the assurance of eternal life is only found in the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who not only died for us, but on the third day was raised ultimately to ascend to heaven to sit at God’s right hand. If you believe that, if you trust him for your salvation today, then you’ll turn from your sins in repentance, you’ll make that decision to live for God; and upon your confession of faith that Jesus is the Christ, the son of God, you’ll give yourself to him in the waters of baptism, being immersed for the remission of your sins, so that you might truly be saved from your sins to live a new life.

As Peter said in Acts 2:38, Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit; for this promise is for you and for your children, and all who are afar off, as many as the Lord our God shall call to Him.

Have you been obedient to the gospel of Christ, believing, repenting, confessing your faith, being baptized into Christ?

And do you continue to walk in the light of Jesus Christ, to strive to serve him, to follow him, to live for him?

Being honest about your sins and trusting him, you can today have the assurance, the certainty about your life. As John said in 1 John 5:13, These things are written that you may know that you have eternal life. That is, those who believe on the name of the Son of God, that you may continue to believe in the name of the Son of God.

Singing>> Will your anchor hold in the storms of life when the clouds unfold their wings of strife?
When the strong tides lift and the cables strain, will your anchor drift or firm remain?

We have an anchor that keeps the soul
steadfast and sure while the billows roll,
fastened to the rock which cannot move,
grounded firm and deep in the Savior’s love.

It is safely moored, twill the storm withstand,
for tis well secured by the savior’s hand.
And the cables passed from his heart to mine can defy the blast through strength divine.

We have an anchor that keeps the soul
steadfast and sure while the billows roll,
fastened to the rock which cannot move,
grounded firm and deep in the Savior’s love.

>> Years I spent in vanity and pride,
caring not my Lord was crucified,
knowing not it was for me he died on Calvary.

Mercy there was great, and grace was free;
pardon there was multiplied to me;
there my burdened soul found liberty, at Calvary.

Oh, the love that drew salvation’s plan;
oh, the grace that brought it down to man;
oh, the mighty gulf that God did span at Calvary.

Mercy there was great, and grace was free;
pardon there was multiplied to me;
there my burdened soul found liberty, at Calvary.

ROBERT >> I want to thank you for watching our program today. We’d love to hear from you. So let me encourage you to contact us with your questions, comments, or requests at The Truth In Love, P.O. Box 865, Hurst, Texas 76053. You may e-mail us at requests@ttil.tv. Or call our toll-free number, 800-819-2966. And also, please visit our web site at www.ttil.tv. Remember, all our materials and services are absolutely free of charge. We just want to do what we can to help us all towards heaven. So let us know how we can help you, and please join us next time right here on The Truth In Love.

>> Sing to me of heaven, sing that song of peace.
From the toils that bind me it will bring release.
Burdens will be lifted that are pressing so, showers of great blessing o’er my heart will flow.

Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall, sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

Sing to me of heaven tenderly and low till the shadows o’er me rise and swiftly go.
When my heart is weary, when the day is long, sing to me of heaven, sing that old, sweet song.

Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall, sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

1574 What Happens When We Die, Part 1

What happens when we die? That’s a great question, and there’s a lot of answers that are being given to it; but what does the Bible have to say?

ROBERT >> What happens when we die? That’s a great question, and there’s a lot of answers that are being given to it; but what does the Bible have to say?

Are we dead all over, like Rover?

Do we cease to exist?

Do we go to some kind of purgatory where we burn off our sins, later to be united with God?

Do we die and go to heaven or go to hell?

What’s it like on the other side of death?

Is there in fact life after death?

Stay tuned. We’ll be back in just a moment.

Singing >> Speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth in love.

ROBERT >> This question, what happens when we die, presupposes that we will die. I want to read this passage to you from Hebrews 9:27. The Hebrew writer says, And as it is appointed for men to die once, but after this the judgment.

Unless we live until the Lord comes again, we will all die. This is an obvious and undeniable fact of life. And thus, this question, what happens after we die, it’s certainly a question that ought to be of concern to us all, because we’re all going to die someday.

Much of what we learn about life after death in the Bible comes from what is known as the parable of the rich man and Lazarus. It’s told by Jesus in Luke chapter 16. Let me encourage you to turn over there. There are some who do not believe that we can view this story as factual because it is viewed as a parable. But I want you to notice, even if this is not a true story that actually happened, if it’s a parable, that even parables are true to life.

They’re not myths, they’re not fables, but they’re always consistent with the facts of life. For example, everyone can see that Jesus’ parable of the sower in Matthew chapter 13 is just as things really are. If you’re familiar with that particular parable, you remember in the parable that Jesus tells the sower sows the seed, and that seed falls on different soils that produce different results. The birds will come, and they’ll take away the seed that’s sown on the path; the seed that grows up on the rocky ground is quickly withered by the sun; and that sown among the thorns is choked out; and what is sown in the good soil bears much fruit.

Those who heard Jesus tell that parable, they may have been able to see someone out there sowing the seed. But you see, if we don’t know anything about sowing seed, we could learn from his parable many facts about it, because parables are always consistent with the facts of life. Now, in the very same way, the story of the rich man and Lazarus is true to the facts of life, and we may learn much about life after death from this parable, from this reading.

It may even have been about two real persons who lived and died. But however you view it, the parable can give as many insights into what happens when we die. It can show us a whole lot about it. And so let’s see what the Bible says, and let’s see what happens when we die.

First of all, let’s notice that when we die, our body is separated from our spirit. The word death itself means separation. The idea of physical death, and that’s what we’re talking about this morning, is separation of the body from the spirit.

Let me read this passage to you from James 2:26, where James describes for us what physical death really is. James 2:26, For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.

So physical death is this separation of body from the spirit. The spirit leaves the body. That’s physical death. Spiritual death, and sometimes the word death is used that way in the Bible, is a separation of man from God.

Let me read you this passage from Isaiah chapter 59, where Isaiah was talking to the people of God, the people of Israel, and warning them to turn from their sins because their sins were separating them from God. It was destroying their relationship with their God. Isaiah 59:1, Behold, the Lord’s hand is not shortened, that it cannot save; nor His ear heavy, that it cannot hear. But your iniquities have separated you from your God; and your sins have hidden His face from you, so that He will not hear.

That kind of separation of man from God because of our sins is what the Bible speaks of as death. A spiritual death.

We see the word used this way in Romans 6:23. So let me read there what the apostle Paul wrote. Romans 6:23. Here he says, For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

In that passage the apostle Paul was talking not about physical death. We all die physically. But he was talking about spiritual death. That’s what happens to us because of our sins. The wages of sin is death.

You see, our sins have earned for us spiritual death, separation from God. That’s what we have earned. That’s what we deserve because of our sins. But the gift of God, he says, is eternal life through Christ Jesus our Lord. Through Jesus Christ, we are reconciled to God, we are made right with God, as Paul explains in 2 Corinthians 5:19 and 21.

So the first thing I want you to notice about what happens when we die is the spirit leaves the body. There’s a separation of the body from the spirit.

Now, the second thing that we can note about what happens when we die is that our body returns to the earth, and our spirit to God. This is spelled out very clearly in Ecclesiastes 12:7. So look back here with me in your Old Testament.

Ecclesiastes 12:7. Here’s what Solomon, the inspired writer, tells us: Then the dust will return to the earth as it was; and the spirit will return to God, who gave it.

You remember, don’t you, at the beginning when God created man that he created him from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, Genesis 2:7? That’s right. Man was made from the dust of the earth. And when he dies, his body will return to the dust of the earth. But the spirit of man, made in the image of God, will return to God.

Look at Genesis 1:26-27 when it speaks of God creating man for the very first time. Here it says, Genesis 1:26, Then God said, let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness. Let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth. And so God created man in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. So you have man made from the dust of the ground, as we noticed in Genesis 2:7; but we also see that there is the spirit of man that’s made in the very image of God.

God is a spirit according to John 4:24-25. And so we understand that there is a spiritual side of man made in the image of God. In Hebrews 12:9 we learn that God is the father of our spirits. And so the body will return to the dust of the earth, but the spirit, it will return to God who gave it.

Now here’s a third thing that we need to learn about what happens when we die. When we die, we have no more involvement with life on the earth. We’re not going to know anything else about this earth. We’ll know nothing more about it, and we’ll never more share in anything under the sun, as the writer of Ecclesiastes puts.

Let me turn over there with you once again. Look at Ecclesiastes chapter 9. Notice what he says about our consciousness when we die. Chapter 9, verse 5 and verse 6, For the living know that they will die; but the dead know nothing, and they have no more reward, for the memory of them is forgotten. Also their love, their hatred, and their envy have now perished; nevermore will they have a share in anything done under the sun.

You see, when you die, yes, your body returns to the dust, your spirit back to God who gave it; but you see, the spirit of man is no longer involved in this earth. All of that’s gone. The body of the earth is perishing now. It’s in the grave. We don’t know any more about this.

Look what he says in verse 10 of Ecclesiastes 9. Here it says, Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with your might; for there is no work or device or knowledge or wisdom in the grave where you are going.

This doesn’t mean, don’t misunderstand what the writer is saying here, this doesn’t mean that we’re unconscious in death; but that we have no involvement with life here on the earth. The body is perishing, but the spirit continues on. And the spirit has a consciousness. And we’re going to talk about that a little bit later on. But understand that when you die and your spirit goes to be with God, that it has no more involvement in the things of this earth.

But now I want you to notice this point: What happens when we die? We are in Hades.

Now, that is a Greek word, Hades, and it literally means unseen. This particular word as is used in the New Testament is used of the dwelling place of the spirits of the dead.

Our spirits are invisible, and they’re in that invisible realm called Hades. For some, it’s a place of torment; and for some, it is a place of comfort. When we look here at the parable of the rich man and Lazarus in Luke chapter 16, we see this very thing.

Let me begin at the beginning of this parable. Luke chapter 16, beginning in verse 19, There was a certain rich man who was clothed in purple and fine linen and fared sumptuously every day. But there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, full of sores, who laid at his gate, desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man’s table. Moreover the dogs came and licked his sores. And so it was that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s bosom. The rich man also died and was buried. And being in torments in Hades, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.

Now, let me stop right here for just a moment, and I want you to see here that when they died, their bodies went back to the dust, they were buried; but the spirit of Lazarus and the spirit of the rich man went to a different place. They went to Hades, into the unseen realm. And as we just read, we notice that one was in torment, the other in comfort. When the rich man died, he was in torment in Hades.

Read on with me here, and notice what it says again in verse 23. Being in torments in Hades, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.

I want you to notice something about Hades. When Jesus died, he was in Hades. But he was not left there. He was raised from the dead.

Look with me in Acts 2:27. In this passage the apostle Peter is talking about the resurrection of Jesus Christ, how he was not left in the tomb. And he quotes from an Old Testament passage, Psalm 16. Psalm 16 was actually a prophecy concerning the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Let’s see what it says.

Acts 2:27, For You will not leave My soul in Hades, nor will You allow Your Holy One to see corruption. You see, the soul or the spirit of Jesus was in Hades when he died; but he says you’re not going to leave me there. And his body was in the tomb; but he said you’re not going to let me see corruption. You’re not going to leave me there in that tomb. His body and his spirit would once again be reunited. He would be raised from the dead.

Read on what it says here in the book of Acts in verse 31. He, foreseeing this, spoke concerning the resurrection of the Christ, that His soul was not left in Hades, nor did His flesh see corruption.

So the rich man, when he died, he was buried, but his spirit was in Hades. He was in torment. Jesus went to Hades, but Jesus was not in torment. Jesus was in Paradise.

That’s right. When Jesus Christ died, Jesus Christ was not in torment, but in Paradise. He was in Paradise along with the thief who died on the cross next to him.

Look with me in Luke 23:43. Jesus was on the cross. And you remember one of those thieves on one side of Jesus repented when he saw that Jesus was dying for his sins, and he called upon Christ for his blessing. And this is what it says, Luke 23:43: And Jesus said to him, Assuredly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise. That day Jesus died, that day the thief next to him died, but they were both found together in Paradise.

Now, that word Paradise is an oriental word, and it’s a word that speaks of a beautiful garden, like the Garden of Eden. You remember how it’s described in Genesis the 2nd chapter, the rivers there in the garden and the trees in the garden and the fruit of that garden, the tree of life in the midst of that garden? Man had everything that he needed. It was a beautiful place where God had placed the first man and the first woman in the Garden of Eden. It was Paradise.

And similarly, when Jesus died, he and the thief found themselves in Paradise.

You know the faithful are promised the tree of life in Paradise? Look with me in Revelation 2:7, where John in this particular book was encouraging the faithful Christians who were suffering such great persecution by the hands of the Roman empire. And he wanted them to know that if they’ll be faithful, they would be rewarded with Paradise. Revelation 2:7, he said, He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches: To him who overcomes I will give to eat from the tree of life which is in the midst of the Paradise of God.

Yes, that’s what happens when we die when we’re faithful to Jesus Christ. We go to Hades, just like Lazarus in Abraham’s bosom, a place of comfort; in Paradise, just like Jesus in this beautiful garden, this spiritual garden that will house our spirit.

This Paradise is referred to as the third heaven. Look with me in 2 Corinthians 12:24. 2 Corinthians, the apostle Paul speaks of a man who went to Paradise. And it’s very interesting what he has to say about it.

2 Corinthians chapter 12, beginning with verse 2. I know a man in Christ who fourteen years ago –whether in the body, I do not know, or whether out of the body, I do not know, God knows — such a one was caught up to the third heaven. And I know such a man –whether in the body or out of the body, I do not know, God knows –how he was caught up into Paradise and heard inexpressible words, which is not lawful for a man to utter.

So we see here that when we die, we go to Paradise if we’re faithful to the Lord, and that’s called the third heaven. The Bible actually speaks of three heavens. The Bible speaks of earth’s atmosphere. That’s the sky. That’s where the birds fly. And we read about that in the book of Genesis. Look with me in Genesis chapter 1, where we see described for us how God created this world. And in verse 20 it says, Then God said, Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.

So when you look in the sky and you see the birds fly there, that’s the first heaven.

But then I want you to notice a second heaven. Look in Genesis 1:16-17. Then God made two great lights, the greater light to rule the day, the lesser light to rule the night. He made the stars also. God set them in the firmament of the heavens to give light on the earth.

You see here how God set these two great lights and the stars in the second heaven. This is the sun, this is the moon, this is the stars. We call it outer space.

The first heaven, our atmosphere; the second heaven, outer space; but then there’s the third heaven. This is where God dwells. Look at 1 Kings 8:30. When Solomon went to dedicate the temple to God, he spoke of the God of heaven. 1 kings Chapter 8, notice with me verse 30. Let’s read that together, 1 Kings 8:30.

Here the Bible says, And may You hear the supplication of Your servant and of Your people Israel when they pray toward this place here in heaven, your dwelling place. And when You hear, forgive. Yes, there are three heavens: Our atmosphere, the outer space, and that heaven where God dwells.

And so the Bible says, and we can be confident and well-pleased, yes, to be absent from the body and to be present with the Lord, 2 Corinthians 5:8.

Paul himself desired to depart. He wanted to die so he could go on and be with Christ, he says in Philippians 1:23. When Lazarus died, we just read in Luke 16:22 that he was carried by angels to Abraham’s bosom. Remember here that Lazarus was comforted, and remember here that God promised blessing through Abraham to all the families of the earth in Genesis 12:3; that Jesus promised blessing and rest to all who die in the Lord, Revelation 14:13. Those who were slain for the word of God should rest according to Revelation 6:11.

Yes, what happens when we die? We go to Hades. We either go to Hades where there’s torment or to Hades where there’s comfort in Abraham’s bosom in Paradise, in the third heaven to be with the Lord.

Singing >> On Zion’s glorious summit stood a numerous host redeemed by blood.
They hymned their king in strains divine.
I joined the throng and strove to join.

While everlasting ages roll,
eternal love shall feast their soul, and scenes of bliss forever new rise in succession to their view. Holy, holy, holy Lord.

God of hosts on high adored.
Who like me thy praise should sing, oh almighty king?

Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of hosts on high adored. Holy, holy, holy.

ROBERT >> Thanks for watching our program today. We’d love to hear from you. Let me encourage you to contact us with your questions and comments or requests at The Truth In Love, P.O. Box 865, Hurst, Texas 76053. You may e-mail us at requests@ttil.tv. Or call our toll-free number, 800-819-2966. Also, please visit our web site at www.ttil.tv. All our materials and services are absolutely free of charge. We just want to do what we can to help us all towards heaven.

So let us know how we can help you, and please join us next time right here on The Truth In Love.

Singing >> Sing to me of heaven, sing that song of peace.
From the toils that bind me it will bring release.
Burdens will be lifted that are pressing so, showers of great blessing o’er my heart will flow.

Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall, sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

Sing to me of heaven tenderly and low till the shadows o’er me rise and swiftly go.
When my heart is weary, when the day is long, sing to me of heaven, sing that old, sweet song. Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.

Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall, sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

1573 Do All In His Name: His Glory

Does your life bring praise and glory to God? Sometimes we forget about God. Sometimes we neglect God. We try to put him out of our mind. We don’t want to think there is a God because if there’s a God, we might have to give account to him. But we are told to do all to the praise of God. Let’s explore this idea.

ROBERT >> Does your life bring praise and glory to God? I don’t mean just on Sunday, but I mean Monday and Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. Every day of the week, everywhere that you go, what you say, what you do, are you glorifying God with your life? Stay tuned. We’ll be back in just a moment.

>> Speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth in love.

ROBERT >> The last couple of weeks here on The Truth In Love we’ve been studying from Colossians the 3rd chapter. I hope you’ll look with me there this morning as we continue in Colossians 3:17, where I remind you the Bible says, Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord, giving thanks to God through Him. We’ve seen that this is a comprehensive passage, an all-encompassing verse that takes in all of our life, whatever we do in word or in deed. And to do all in the name of the Lord means to do it consistently with his person, according to his character. Would Jesus sign his name to it? Can you say that your life is consistent with the heart and with the life of Jesus Christ? Is it consistent with his person?

And we’ve also learned that to do something in the name of the Lord means to do it with his power. You see, if we bring his person into our heart and life, we also bring his power, his authority. We must look to Jesus to see what he would have us to do and for the power to do it. And I want you to see today how that that power is associated with the word of Jesus Christ.

We have no authority from Christ and we have no power from Christ unless we have the word of Christ. I want us to go to Luke the 7th chapter, and I want you to see how this is brought out in this episode in the life of Jesus with a centurion of the Roman army. Here in Luke chapter 7, we see the centurion had a servant who was very sick, and the centurion wanted Jesus to heal his servant. Let’s see what it says here, Luke chapter 7, beginning in verse 1. Now when He concluded all His sayings in the hearing of the people, He entered Capernaum. And a certain centurion’s servant, who was dear to him, was sick and ready to die. And so when he heard about Jesus, he sent elders of the Jews to Him, pleading with Him to come and heal his servant. And when they came to Jesus, they begged Him earnestly, saying that the one for whom He should do this was deserving, for he loves our nation, and has built us a synagogue. Then Jesus went with him. And when He was already not far from the house, the centurion sent friends to Him, saying to Him, Lord, do not trouble Yourself, for I am not worthy that You should enter under my roof. Therefore I did not even think myself worthy to come to You. But say the word, and my servant will be healed.

Now I want to stop here for just a moment because I want you to see that the centurion believed that if Jesus would just speak the word, his servant could be healed. You see, the centurion realized that the power and the authority of Jesus Christ is found in his word. He understood that because he was a centurion. Look what he explains as you go on here in Luke chapter 7. For example, notice what it says in verse 8. He says, For I also am a man placed under authority, having soldiers under me. And I say to one, Go, and he goes; and to another, Come, and he comes; and to my servant, Do this, and he does it. You see, this man understood authority. This man understood power. He gave a command to his servants, they did it. If he didn’t give that command, they would not do it. And so it is in our relationship with Jesus Christ. Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord. Our doctrine, our practice, our life ought to be lived by his name; and that is by his authority, by his power.

We must have a word from Jesus if we’re going to do it. And if we have a word from Jesus to do it, he will provide us the power to accomplish that work. And so today I want to emphasize not only the person of Christ, but the power of Christ. When it comes to doing things in the name of Jesus, it means doing it by his authority and by his power. And that means that we’re going to have to have his word.

Look with me in Colossians chapter 3, and let’s notice verse 16. Colossians 3:16. Here the apostle Paul says, Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord. Let the word of Christ dwell in you, he says. The word dwell there is to tabernacle. It speaks of a temporary dwelling place, a tent or something like that. And so he’s telling us, you need to let the word of Christ live in you. You need to let the word of Christ dwell there. You need to give Christ’s word run of your house, of your heart.

You know who has the run of the house where I live? It’s not me, it’s not my wife; it’s our little poodle, our little four and a half pound poodle named Lindsey. She has the run of the house. She’s in control. But we must make Jesus in control of our house. We must put him over our house, over our heart, over our life.

As Paul said in Philippians 1:21, For me to live is Christ, and to die is gain. The apostle Paul understood what it meant to do all things in the name of the Lord, by his authority, by his power. He said in Colossians 3:4, Christ is our life. It’s not about me or what I want; it’s about Christ and about what he wants for our lives. And so we must give him place in our hearts through his word. There’s his power. There’s his authority. Let the word of Christ, he says, dwell in you richly.

The other day I found that my wife had made some good desserts: Cheesecake with some cherries and that rich, red syrup. I can tell you that that dessert was rich. It was full of sugar. And we’re to let the word of Christ dwell in us richly. We need to fill our hearts. We need to fill our lives with the words of Jesus Christ, because there’s the power and there is the authority. Do we realize the incredible power of the word of God?

You just have to go back to Genesis the first chapter. And you remember when we read about the creation of this world, how the Bible says that God said, Let there be light? And there was light. That’s the power of the word of God. Look with me if you would in Psalm 33. In Psalm 33 we read about the creation of this universe and how God just simply spoke the universe into existence. I’m going to pick it up here in verse 6 of Psalm 33. Here’s what the Psalmist writes: By the word of the Lord the heavens were made, and all the host of them by the breath of His mouth. He gathers the waters of the sea together as a heap; He lays up the deep in storehouses. Let all the earth fear the Lord; let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of Him. For He spoke, and it was done; He commanded, and it stood fast. That’s the power and the authority of the word. In Hebrews 1:3 we find that not only was this world created by God’s word, but it is being upheld by his word. Upholding all things by the word of His power. He was talking about the word of Christ. Our universe is sustained, it’s kept, it’s preserved by the word of Christ.

The word of Christ is powerful to save our souls according to James 1:21, where the Bible says, Receive with meekness the implanted word which is able to save your souls. Paul himself had said in Romans 1:16, I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ, for it is the power of God unto salvation to everyone who believes; to the Jew first and also to the Greek. But I want you to notice where the apostle Paul said in Colossians 3:17, Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, he said let it dwell in you richly in all wisdom. So I want us to go back and look at Psalm 14:1, which points out that there are a lot of fools in our world because they have rejected the word of Christ because their hearts are not filled with his word. In Psalm 14:1, the Bible says, The fool has said in his heart, There is no God. You see, there are many foolish people today who deny the very existence of God, and therefore they have no values and they have no guidance from God. They have in fact rejected two great realities in this world, and they’re not living in reality at all, but in an imaginary world.

The fool has said in his heart, There is no God. That’s foolish. That’s not living in reality. Of course there is a God. Psalm 19:1, you remember the Bible says, The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament shows His handiwork. All we have to do is look up and to see in this universe that there is a God. He’s the only logical, reasonable explanation for the existence of this universe. Look what the apostle Paul had to say in Romans 1:20. Here he says, For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse, because, although they knew God, they did not glorify Him as God.

The problem is not that we don’t know there’s a God. Of course there is a God. But sometimes we forget about God. Sometimes we neglect God. We try to put him out of our mind. We don’t want to think there is a God, because if there’s a God, we might have to give account to him. This is something else that we need to recognize. This is another one of those facts, another one of those points of reality that many people dismiss. In Romans 2:15 we see that every man has a conscience. Every man has thoughts that are either excusing him or accusing him. That’s what it says here in Romans 2:15. We’re different from all the other creatures on this earth.

Man has a conscience because he’s made in the image of God. And that conscience lets him know there are some things he can do and there are some things he can’t do. That conscience tells us that there is a God and that we’re going to be accountable to him one day. Listen, the Bible says in Proverbs 1:7 that, The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; but the fool despises wisdom and instruction. You’re not born with wisdom. You have to grow into it. You have to learn and you have to experience in order to have wisdom.

Even our Lord and savior Jesus Christ increased in wisdom and stature and favor with God and man according to Luke 2:52. And each of us, we’re going to grow in wisdom as we let the word of Christ dwell in us. I look in Hebrews chapter 5, and the Hebrew writer writes about those Christians who would allow the word of God to shape and transform their lives. And here’s what he says in Hebrews 5:13: For everyone who partakes only of milk is unskilled in the word of righteousness, for he is a babe; but solid food belongs to those who are of full age. That is, those who, by reason of use have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil. You see, there are some folks who have never grown up in the word, haven’t been using the word, they haven’t been putting it to practice in their life, and so they’ve never grown in their wisdom. But here he speaks of those who have matured on that word. By the reason of use they have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil. That’s where wisdom comes from.

When we let God’s word in our heart richly in all wisdom, you see, and we live that out in our life, that’s how we see us doing things in the name of the Lord, by his power, by his authority. That’s how it happens. And what’s the result the of that? Look what pours out of our heart. Going back here to Colossians chapter 3, notice what it says again in verse 16. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.

You see, when we fill our hearts with the word of Christ, when we’re living by his power and by his authority, we can’t help but to sing out to the Lord. I might ask those who are listening today, have you had any vocal training? Do you know music? Can you read the musical notes? And most of you would probably say, no, I really don’t read music. I really haven’t had any vocal training. But you don’t have to worry about that. That’s not really what this passage is all about. This is about those who have been walking in the word, who have been living in the word, and they can’t help but to sing to the Lord, to teach and admonish one another, to sing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, to sing and make melody in their hearts to God. That’s what God wants from us.

I remember when I was a young person and I was baptized into Jesus Christ and I began to learn all of those songs that we used to sing as teenagers. And I would sing those songs over and over, day after day, not because I knew how to sing, because believe me, I didn’t; but because I had something to sing about.

It’s like that Ethiopian eunuch you read about in Acts the 8th chapter. When he was baptized into Jesus Christ, they brought him up out of that water a new creation. And the Bible says that he went on his way rejoicing, Acts 8:39. What was different? Now he’d come to know Jesus as his Lord and as his savior. His sins were forgiven. He had been baptized into Christ. And so he went on his way rejoicing.

I look in Acts the 16th chapter in verse 25, and here are Paul and Silas, and they’re in prison because of their faith. They’d been beaten with rods, they’d been put in the inner prison. It was at midnight. And you know what they were doing? They were praying and they were singing hymns to God. And the prisoners were listening. It didn’t matter if they knew musical notes, if they couldn’t hit a tune in a bucket. But you see, they were praising God. They had something to sing about.

Revelation the 14th chapter, you’ll notice here in verse 2 and verse 3 what it says about these Christian martyrs, these who had come through persecution and trial and difficulty. God had delivered them on the other side of death into comfort and into victory. And so it says here in Revelation 14:2, I heard a voice from heaven like the voice of many waters, and like the voice of loud thunder. And I heard the sound of harpists playing their harps. They sang as it were a new song before the throne. You see, they sang a new song. It was their song. It came out of their experience, their persecution, and their trial. They had something to sing about. It was a song of deliverance. It was a song of victory.

Folks, when we let the word of Christ dwell in us richly in all wisdom, when we pour out our hearts to God in song, he’s going to get the praise. This is something that I want to emphasize before leaving this lesson today. You see, if we will do all things in the name of the Lord, that is, consistent with his person, his character, who he is, if we’ll do all things in the name of the Lord, that is, by his power, according to his authority, then it will all result in his praise.

I remember when I was over in England the last couple of weeks, and we saw many cathedrals and we saw many castles and memorials and plaques and statues and all of these things that were erected in honor, in memory, in praise of some famous or powerful or rich person, maybe a religious leader, whatever it is. You found that kind of thing all over England. And the same thing is true in our relationship to Jesus Christ.

You see, Jesus Christ is to be honored and to be glorified through us, his people, his church. His reputation is at stake, and that’s why we must do everything in the name of the Lord.

You see, what do you know about me as a person, I mean about who I really am on the inside? Only from my body, from I say, from what I do, from how I act and how I dress. That tells you a little bit about who I am, gives you a look on the inside. And who is the church but the body of Jesus Christ? Christ is head over all things to the church, which is his body, the fullness of Him that fills all in all, Ephesians 1:22-23.

So how’s the world going to know anything about Jesus if we do not show them, if they cannot see it in us? Indeed, the Bible says in 1 Corinthians 10:31, Whatever you do in word or deed, do all to the glory of God. Whatever you do, whether you eat or drink, he said in that passage, do all to the glory of God. It’s for his glory, it’s for his praise. Look in Hebrews the 13th chapter and notice verse 15 and verse 16. Here he says, Therefore by Him, Jesus Christ, let us continually offer the sacrifice of praise to God that is the fruit of our lips, giving thanks to His name. But do not forget to do good and to share, for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. You see, it’s in praising God continually, not only with our lips, but also with our life, doing good and sharing with others that God gets the glory, that God gets the praise. And one final passage, in 1 Peter 4:11, notice what he says about this very point. Here he says, If anyone speaks, let him speak as the oracles of God. If anyone ministers, let him do it as with the ability which God supplies, that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom belong the glory and the dominion forever and ever. Amen. To do all things in the name of the Lord then is to do it by his person, by his power, and for his praise. If you’re a Christian today, you want to convert your friends, you want to show them Jesus? Then that’s what you need to be doing.

If you really want to bring them to Christ, you’re going to have to show them Christ. You’re not going to go everywhere they go and do everything they do and say what they say and dress like they dress and be like they would be. You want to be like Jesus Christ. Show Christ to your friends. Show Christ to your parents. Clean up your room. Do what they ask you to do. Give them honor in your home. You parents want to influence your children for Christ? Then show them Christ in how you live your life and how you treat them in the home.

You want to convert all of those around you, maybe those that you’re working with or those at school, your teachers or whoever it is, whatever you’re doing in life? You see, Christ’s reputation is at stake when you carry his name. When you do all things in his name, you have his power, and it’s for his praise. Remember, salvation is only found in the name of Jesus Christ. There is no other name under heaven whereby we must be saved.

>> I know that my redeemer lives and ever prays for me.
I know eternal life he gives from sin and sorrow free.

I know, I know that my redeemer lives.
I know, I know eternal life he gives.
I know, I know that my redeemer lives.

I know, I know that my redeemer lives.
I know, I know eternal life he gives.
I know, I know that my redeemer lives.

ROBERT >> I do want to thank you so much for watching our program today. I hope you’ve been encouraged to turn your heart and your life over to Jesus Christ and to walk in his power and to walk for his praise and for his glory. As I mentioned just a few moments ago, remember, our salvation is only found in his name. It’s found in the name and by the power of Jesus Christ. And I want you to know today that your faith response to that good news, to the gospel is also in the name of Jesus Christ. According to 1 John chapter 5, we must believe in his name. Look what it says here in chapter 5, verse 1: Whoever believes that Jesus the Christ is born of God, and everyone who loves Him who begot also loves him who is begotten of Him. John goes on to talk about the importance of putting our faith in Jesus Christ. He says in verse 11, And this is the testimony: that God has given us eternal life, and this life is in His Son. He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have life. These things I have written to you who believe in the name of the Son of God, that you may know that you have eternal life, and that you may continue to believe in the name of the Son of God.

So you must believe in the name of the Son of God. And you must be baptized into the name of the Son of God. If we truly believe on him, we’ll give ourself to him in the waters of baptism.

The Bible says in Acts 10:48 to be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. We are to be baptized into his name, by his authority, by his power. In Acts 22:16, the preacher said, Arise and be baptized and wash away your sins, calling on the name of the Lord. It’s in that faith response of baptism that we call upon God’s name, on Christ’s name, on his power to save us, to cleanse us, to make us a new creation in Jesus Christ.

And if we’ll continue in that kind of faith, as we just read here in 1 John 5:13, then we can know that we have eternal life. I hope that you have that hope and that assurance in your heart today.

And I hope if you have any questions today or comments or requests or you would need some more Bible study or prayers, if you want some more information about our lesson, if you would like today’s lesson or any other lesson on CD or DVD, in manuscript form, then write us here at The Truth In Love, P.O. Box 865, Hurst, Texas 76053. E-mail us at requests@ttil.tv. Call our toll-free number, 800-819-2966. Or visit our web site, www.ttil.tv. We just want to do what we can to help us all towards heaven. So please, will you let us know here at The Truth In Love how we can help you, and please join us next time right here on The Truth In Love.

>> Sing to me of heaven, sing that song of peace.
From the toils that bind me it will bring release.
Burdens will be lifted that are pressing so, showers of great blessing o’er my heart will flow.

Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall, sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

Sing to me of heaven tenderly and low till the shadows o’er me rise and swiftly go.
When my heart is weary, when the day is long, sing to me of heaven, sing that old, sweet song.

Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall, sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

1572 Do All In His Name: His Power

Colossians 3:17 states, “Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God through Him.” What does that mean for the Christian? What hope does it give us for achieving what God wants?

ROBERT >> Today on The Truth In Love we want to talk about the power and the authority of Jesus Christ from a very pivotal passage in Colossians 3:17. Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God through Him.

>> Speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth, speaking the truth in love.

ROBERT >> I do hope you have your Bibles turned to Colossians chapter 3 as we continue to study here from verse 17, where the Bible says, Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God through Him.

Yes, whatever we do ought to be done in the name of the Lord Jesus. And we learned last week that when we talk about the name of the Lord Jesus, we’re talking about the person of Christ, we’re talking about his person, we’re talking about who he is, that we would have the heart of Christ, that we would live the life of Jesus Christ, a life consistent with who Jesus is. But I want you to notice this morning that to do something in the name of somebody not only means to do it according to his person, but it also means to do it according to his power or his authority.

You see, when you bring a person into what you’re doing, you’re also bringing with that person his power. And I want you to notice the power of Jesus. In Matthew chapter 28, beginning in verse 18, after his resurrection, just before ascending into heaven, Jesus was gathered with his apostles. And look at the claim that he makes for himself here. All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth. Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the world. Amen.

You see, Jesus Christ claims to have all authority: To have all authority in heaven and on the earth. And that means when it comes to what I say or whatever I do, whatever I do in word or whatever I do in deed, whatever my doctrine, whatever my practice, how I live my life, I look to Jesus for his authority and for his power. You see, I don’t look to some man on the earth. I don’t look to some group of men on the earth. I don’t look to some council or some convention. But when I want to know what should be my belief, what should be my practice, how should I live my life, how should the church conduct its services and carry out its work and its worship and all of these kinds of things that come to play, I need to look to Jesus Christ for my authority and for my power.

The people of Jesus’ day understood that, and Jesus taught that. If you’ll look back in Matthew chapter 21, you’ll see Jesus have a discussion with the religious leaders of his day about this very thing. Here in Matthew chapter 21, let’s begin in verse 23.

Now when He came into the temple, the chief priests and the elders of the people confronted Him as He was teaching, and said, By what authority are You doing these things? And who gave You this authority? Now, those are very good questions, by what authority we do something and where that authority comes from. Jesus answered here in verse 24 and said to them, I also will ask you one thing, which if you tell Me, I likewise will tell you by what authority I do these things: The baptism of John, where was it from? From heaven or from men? Jesus answers their question with a question.

They asked him by what authority he did what he did, and so he asked them by what authority John did what he did. And he made something very clear, that there are but two sources of authority: From heaven and from men. Either it’s from God, or it’s from this earth. But remember, Jesus Christ claimed authority in heaven and on the earth. And so we must go to the proper source of authority, not to men on the earth, but to Jesus Christ, who is in heaven. Jesus Christ is our authority.

So what about John’s baptism? By what authority did he teach and practice that baptism? Well, everybody knew it was from God. But these religious leaders did not want to admit that. Notice the dilemma they found themselves in. Here it says as we continue on in verse 25, And they reasoned among themselves, saying, If we say, From heaven, He will say to us, Why then did you not believe him? But if we say, From men, we fear the multitude, for all count John as a prophet. You see, they were stuck. Any way they answered, they were in trouble. If they said that John did what he did because that’s what God authorized him to do, then they would be in trouble, because they didn’t believe John and they didn’t practice, that is, they did not submit to the baptism of John; but if they said that what John did was from men, that he really didn’t have authority from God to do it, they were afraid of the multitude. They feared the multitude. They wanted their power and their position, their influence over the people, but they were afraid that they might lose it if they disagreed with the people about what John did and by what authority he did it.

And so what did they do? Well, the Bible says here in verse 27 that they answered Jesus and said, We do not know. And He said to them, Neither will I tell you by what authority I do these things. Jesus was not being rude here. He was not trying to keep anything from them, but he was trying to help them to think about what they were doing and by what authority they did it.

We need to think about that today. We need not to act presumptuously. We need not to speak, we need not to do anything unless we first ask, what does Jesus want me to say? What does Jesus want me to do? And this is particularly true when it comes to things like how to become a Christian and how to worship God and how to live our lives as a Christian.

For example, by what authority, by what power do we do what we do and preach what we preach in the church? For example, in becoming a Christian, how can I know how to become a Christian? How can I know how to be saved? Do I listen to what some man says? Do I read it in some tract written by man? Well, only if you can find it in your Bible would you want to believe it and would you want to accept it.

You see, the Bible’s very clear about how to become a Christian. You can read through the book of Acts, and you can see how that people came to the Lord. In every example we will see, that having heard the gospel and believed on that gospel, they would be baptized into Jesus Christ. In fact, Jesus said this in the very beginning even when he was on the earth and he was preparing people for his coming kingdom. He talked to them about being born again, being born of water and the Spirit if they wanted to be a part of the kingdom of God. You read that in John 3:3-5.

But there are those who would tell us, you don’t have to be born again of the water, just of the Spirit. You don’t have to engage yourself in water baptism to be saved. But you remember what Jesus himself said in Mark 16:15-16? He said, you go into all the world and preach the gospel to the whole creation. He that believes and is baptized will be saved; he that disbelieves will be condemned. So Jesus said that one needs to believe and to be baptized so that he might be saved.

I think about Acts the 2nd chapter when the people there were convicted of the fact that Jesus was the Christ, the Lord, the savior, and they asked, What shall we do in Acts 2:37. And I want to read to you the answer of the apostle Peter, and I want you to see what Jesus instructed his apostles to preach about how to become a Christian.

Here it says in verse 38 of Acts chapter 2, Then Peter said to them, Repent, and let every one of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is to you and to your children, and to all who are afar off, as many as the Lord our God will call. And so you see, becoming a Christian is coming to believe on the Lord and savior Jesus Christ and realizing what he did for you at Calvary’s cross, turning from your sin in repentance, as Peter said, to repent, and then being baptized upon the name of Christ, upon your confession of Jesus Christ as Lord and savior, give yourself to him by being immersed in water for the remission of your sins.

The Bible is very clear that this is how we come to Jesus Christ so that we might be saved. Let me read another passage to you from Acts the 22nd chapter and verse 16, where the apostle Paul, once old Saul of Tarsus who persecuted the church, comes to believe on Jesus Christ, and he tells us exactly how he became a Christian. In Acts 22:16, this is what the preacher told him to do. And now why are you waiting? Arise and be baptized, and wash away your sins, calling on the name of the Lord.

So you see, old Saul of Tarsus, once he came to see that Jesus Christ was Lord and savior, he spent three days fasting in prayer, he was penitent, he was sorrowful over his sins, and he was ready to give himself to Christ, and so he got up, he was baptized so that his sins could be washed away. It was in that act of baptism that he called upon the name of the Lord. You see, he did what he did by the authority and by the power of Jesus Christ. This is how we’re saved today.

The same thing would be true when it comes to the worship of the church. How do we know how to worship God but to see what Christ has authorized in the new covenant? We look at the church of the first century, and we see how they gathered together on the first day of the week to break bread, to partake of the Lord’s supper, as we read in Acts 20:7. We also see how that the early church would sing and make melody in their hearts to the Lord, Ephesians 5:19. And many wonder, why don’t they use musical instruments? Simply because there’s no authority from Jesus Christ to do so.

That wasn’t the way the church of the New Testament worshiped the Lord. And so we don’t do that today. We don’t act presumptuously.

And that’s not only true in how to become a Christian and how to worship God, but how to live our lives every day. On Monday, on Tuesday, on Wednesday, on Thursday, on Friday, and on Saturday I must be thinking, whatever I do, whatever I say in word or in deed, whatever I say, whatever I do, I must do it in the name of the Lord; that is, by his authority and by his power.

We need to recognize that when we bring Jesus’ name to what we’re doing, we’re not only bringing his person, but we’re bringing his power. And that ought to be encouraging to us. That ought to be comforting to us. It ought to give us confidence in what we’re trying to do as we strive to follow after Jesus, as we strive to accomplish his will in our lives.

In Acts the 3rd chapter, we read about Peter and John coming to the temple. And they find a man that’s lame, and they heal him. But I want you to notice how this is put here in Acts 3:6. Then Peter said, Silver and gold I do not have, but what I do have I give you: In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, rise up and walk.

So you see here how that Peter and John were able to heal this lame man in the name of Jesus, that is, by his authority. They were permitted, in fact, they were commissioned to use this power to heal this one. They did it by the authority of Jesus. They did it by the power of Jesus.

Look how this is described in Acts 4:7. And when they had set them in the midst, they asked, By what power or by what name have you done this? You see, when they healed that man, it was in the name of Jesus. And that means by the power or the authority of Jesus.

And Peter and John were later threatened by their enemies, and notice what the enemies said to them in Acts 4:18. So they called them and commanded them not to speak at all nor to teach in the name of Jesus. By his power, by his authority.

Now, it’s our commission to teach and to preach and to do everything in the name of Jesus, by his power and by his authority. And again, that ought to be comforting to us. That ought to give us confidence when you take the name of Jesus, when you claim his power, when you claim his authority.

Let’s take, for example, some of the applications of this that the apostle Paul gives us back here in Colossians chapter 3 in our text. You remember in verse 17 where he said, Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord. Immediately following that, he tells us what to do in verse 18.

He speaks to the wives. Submit to your own husbands as is fitting in the Lord. A wife says, Paul, you don’t know what kind of husband I have. Maybe not. But you see, in the name of the Lord, wives, you can learn to fulfill the role that God has given for you, to support your husband, to help your husband to be the kind of man of God that God would have him to be. You can be that wife who serves her husband for the very best of her family and for the glory of God because you have the power and the authority of Jesus Christ.

He goes on in verse 19, Husbands, love your wives, and do not be bitter toward them. Somebody says, Paul, you don’t know what kind of wife I have. Maybe not. But again, you do this in the name of the Lord, by his authority and by his power. You remember Ephesians 5:25? Really it’s the parallel here to Colossians 3, where we learn from Paul that husbands are to love their wives as Christ also loved the church and gave himself for it. Now, I’m thinking, I could never love my wife like Christ loved the church. Oh, but I can do that in the name of the Lord, by his authority and by his power. I’ll be that sacrificial husband. I’ll serve her and I’ll love her just as Christ loved the church.

And then continue reading on in Colossians 3. He speaks to the children in verse 20. Children, obey your parents in all things, for this is well pleasing to the Lord. Again, I can hear the children saying, you don’t know my parents, Paul. But you see, God gives us strength and gives us power through Jesus Christ to do all things.

And the same is true to you fathers or to you parents. Do not provoke your children, lest they become discouraged. That’s what he says here in verse 21. Fathers, no doubt, is here put for parents as it is in Hebrews 11:23. And again, some of the parents may be saying, Paul, you don’t know my kids. Sometimes they require so much of us, and sometimes they seem so difficult. Sometimes it seems impossible. But it’s our job to be the kind of parents God would have us to be. And we can do that in the name of the Lord, with his power, with his authority.

You see, when we bring the name of Jesus to what he would have us to do, we bring his power. If he’s authorized us to do it, if this is what he wants for our life, we’re going to be able to accomplish that will.

Here’s a key verse: John 14:14, where Jesus told his apostles before going to the cross, If you ask anything in My name, I will do it. I’ll do it. You see, we need to let Jesus take over in our heart and let Jesus take over in our life, and we will be able to accomplish his will for our life.

Paul said in Philippians 4:13, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Yes, with the power of Christ in my life, I can be the kind of husband, the kind of father or parent to my children. You ladies, you can be the wives and you can be the mothers that you need to be. And you children, you can be the kind of children that God wants you to be. And even when you leave the church building and you go to work or you go to school or whatever you’re doing in life, you can accomplish God’s will in the name of the Lord.

Look at it here as we continue on in Colossians 3, beginning in verse 22, where he talks to the bondservants and how they are to obey in all things your masters. Maybe we don’t have that servant/master relationship today in our society, but we do have workers who are to serve employers, and it’s the same kind of principle. And look what he tells us here. He says to do that according to the flesh, not with eyeservice, as men. That is, he says, Bondservants, obey in all things your masters according to the flesh, not with eyeservice, as men-pleasers, but in sincerity of heart, fearing God. You don’t be a clock watcher when you’re out there. You don’t think, well, I don’t like this boss, and he’s not a very good boss, and so I just can’t wait till I get out of here; but you go there serving the Lord. Look what he says in verse 23. Whatever you do, do it heartily, as to the Lord and not to men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance; for you serve the Lord Christ. That ought to put a joy in our step.

You know there’s a hidden paycheck when you go to work? You may get a salary from your boss, but there’s a hidden paycheck that you’re going to receive, and you’re not going to receive it until the Lord comes again, but it’s an eternal paycheck. And so let me encourage you, whatever you do, wherever you are, in word or deed, to do all in the name of the Lord.

We see to do all in the name of the Lord, it’s not only do it consistent with his person, with his character, with who he is, but to do it according to his power, by his authority. With God’s help, we can be the kind of people God wants us to be. We can do what God wants us to do.

Another key in this whole passage is found in Colossians 3:16, because you see, if we’re going to do things according to his person and according to his power, then we must let the word of Christ dwell in us. Let’s read it together here, Colossians 3:16. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.

You see, if we do not have his word in our heart, if we are not living that word in our life, then we’ll never be able to bring praise to God. But when we let God’s word run in our hearts, when we let his word take over our lives, then praise will pour out of our hearts, and God will get the glory.

I want to talk to you some more about that, the Lord willing, the next week here on The Truth In Love. But today I want to remind you again that our salvation is in Jesus Christ. Our salvation is in the name of the Lord. There’s no other name under heaven given among men whereby we must be saved, Acts 4:12. It’s by his power that we can find salvation. It’s through his blood that our sins can be washed away, Revelation 1:5. And so I’m encouraging you today to submit to Jesus Christ as Lord and savior, turning from your sins, confessing his name, and giving yourselves to him in baptism. Calling upon the name of the Lord, you can be cleansed, you can be washed, you can become his new creation, and you can enjoy the blessings of Christ now and for all of eternity, and you can be a blessing to others and you can bring glory to God.

So please, let us know here at The Truth In Love how we can help you towards heaven today.

>> Wonderful grace of Jesus, greater than all my sin.
How shall my tongue describe it?
Where shall his praise begin?
Taking away my burden, setting my spirit free.
Oh, the wonderful grace of Jesus reaches me.
Wonderful the matchless grace of Jesus, deeper than the mighty rolling sea.
Wonderful grace all sufficient for me.

Broader than the scope of my transgressions, greater far than all my sin and shame.
Oh magnify the precious name of Jesus, praise his name.

Wonderful grace of Jesus,
reaching the most defiled by its transforming power,
making him God’s dear child.
Purchasing peace and heaven for all eternity,
and the wonderful grace of Jesus reaches me.

Wonderful the matchless grace of Jesus, deeper than the mighty rolling sea.
Wonderful grace all sufficient for me.
Broader than the scope of my transgressions,
greater far than all my sin and shame.
Oh, magnify the precious name of Jesus, praise his name.

ROBERT >> Thank you so much for watching our program today. We’d really like to hear from you. If you have any questions or comments or requests, if you’d like a personal home Bible study or maybe specific prayers, if you’d like to order today’s lesson or any other lesson on CD, DVD, or in manuscript form, let me encourage you to write The Truth In Love. It’s P.O. Box 865, Hurst, Texas 76053. You can e-mail us at requests@ttil.tv. Or just call our toll-free number, 800-819-2966. And also, please visit our website at www.ttil.tv.

And remember that all of our materials and our services are absolutely free of charge. We just want to thank today the many churches of Christ who help support our program and encourage you to visit one of them in your area very soon. I know they’ll be an encouragement to you and a help to you as you strive towards heaven. And we’re going to show their names. They’re going to be scrolled on the screen at the end of our program. We just want to do what we can to help us all towards heaven. Let us know how we can help you, and please join us next time right here on The Truth In Love.

>> Sing to me of heaven, sing that song of peace.
From the toils that bind me it will bring release.
Burdens will be lifted that are pressing so.
Showers of great blessing o’er my heart will flow.

Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall. Sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

Sing to me of heaven tenderly and low, till the shadows o’er me rise and swiftly go.
When my heart is weary, when the day is long, sing to me of heaven, sing that old, sweet song.

Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall.
Sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

1571 Do All In His Name: His Person

Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God through Him. Doing anything in the name of the Lord relates to being consistent with His Person.

ROBERT >> You go to church on Sunday morning, you partake of the Lord’s supper, you put money into the contribution plate; but what about Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday? Does God just want one day out of our life or just part of our income, or does he want our whole life? He doesn’t want just a piece of the pie. He wants the whole pie. God wants our hearts, our lives, every moment submitted to the lordship of Jesus Christ. Whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God through Him. Stay tuned. We’ll be back in just a moment.

SINGING>> Speaking the truth, speaking the truth,
speaking the truth, speaking the truth in love.

ROBERT >> I hope you have your Bibles this morning turned to Colossians 3:17. This is a pivotal passage here in the letter of the Colossians, chapter 3 and chapter 4. It’s an all-encompassing passage. It’s a comprehensive passage.

Whatever you do, the Bible says, in word or deed. That’s a spectrum phrase. It includes the whole spectrum of our life: What we say, what we do. If there’s anything, Paul says, I’ve left out here, if there’s anything that needs to be added to it, I’m talking about the whole of your life, submitting every moment of your life to Jesus Christ. And I want you to see how that the apostle Paul applies this here in this letter. As you begin in the first 15 verses of Colossians chapter 3, if you’ll look there with me, you see first he looks to our heart to find out where our heart really is.

He says here in Colossians 3:1, “If then you were raised with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ is, sitting at the right hand of God.”

You see, he speaks here of that moment in our life when we gave ourself to the Lord Jesus in baptism and were raised up out of the waters of baptism to live a new life. He tells us here that if that be the case, since we have given our life to Jesus, since we’ve been raised up together with him, we ought to have a whole different mindset about us.

Look what he says in verse 2. “Set your mind on things above, not on things on the earth. For you died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. And when Christ who is our life appears, then you also will appear with Him in glory.”

You see, because of Jesus Christ, I now have a new life. And that life is summed up in the name of Jesus Christ. He tells us as you go on in this chapter how there are certain things that we need to put to death, there are certain things that we need to put off so that we can put on the garments of Jesus Christ.

If you look with me here, you’ll notice in verse 5 of chapter 3, “Therefore put to death your members which are on the earth: fornication, uncleanness, passion, evil desire, and covetousness, which is idolatry.”

He goes on to describe it further in the verses that follow. Here he says in verse 6, “Because of these things the wrath of God is coming upon the sons of disobedience, in which you yourselves once walked when you lived in them. But now you yourselves are to put off all these: anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy, filthy language out of your mouth. Do not lie to one another, since you have put off the old man with his deeds, and have put on the new man who is renewed in knowledge according to the image of Him who created him.”

You see, God doesn’t want us going back to our old way of life. God doesn’t want us involved in that old life. Put that life to death so that you can live a new life in Jesus Christ. You’ll notice what it said in verse 10, to put on the new man.

He tells us more about what that means as you look a little further in verse 12, where he says, Therefore as the elect of God, holy and beloved, put on tender mercies, “kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering, all of these things which we might describe as the garments of Christ.”

You see, when you come to Jesus Christ, when you become a Christian, when you’re baptized into Christ, you put on Christ. That’s what Paul said in Galatians 3:26-27. This is how we become the children of God: by faith, putting on Christ in baptism. To do that, we’ve got to die to the old man so that we can be raised up out of the waters of baptism a new man. We’ve got to put on the garments of Christ. And the apostle Paul reminds us of who we are so that we’ll be sure to put on the proper garments.

You’ll notice here in Colossians 3:12 he says, “Therefore as the elect of God, holy and beloved.”

It’s important that we remember who we are in Jesus Christ. We’re God’s chosen ones. We’re the ones who’ve been set apart from this world to live for Jesus Christ. We’re his beloved ones. And if we know who we are, then we’ll know how to dress, I mean to put on the garments of Jesus Christ, to dress up like a Christian, like Jesus would dress. If you notice here in this passage, he speaks of these spiritual garments that we must put on in our life. He describes them here as tender mercies. He’s talking about that compassion of heart that you see in Jesus. He’s talking about those who really care about other people. He speaks here of kindness or generosity. Here these are those who want to do good and to help others. He talks about humility, this idea of one who doesn’t consider himself better than others, one who puts others before himself, the attitude that we read about, for example, in Philippians the 2nd chapter.

If you’ll notice back just a few pages in your Bible, in Philippians 2:3, the apostle Paul writes, “Let nothing be done through selfish ambition or conceit, but in lowliness of mind let each esteem others better than himself.”

And so it’s this attitude of humility that we as Christians must put on. He describes it further here in Colossians 3:12. He speaks of putting on meekness. And that’s not like some have misunderstood it to mean, weakness; but meekness is actually when strength, when power is brought under control. I remember where we used to worship a number of years ago, there was a big man. He had big hands. He was one of the deacons of the church. He was what he called a gentle giant. He was one who was strong, but he was one who was gentle. And that’s the idea of what meekness is really all about. Look as he further describes these garments that we must put on as Christians. He describes here those who are longsuffering. Sometimes the word is translated patience. Because you see, when we’re suffering and that suffering goes on for a long time, we have to deal with that, we have to endure that. That’s what patience is really all about. Life is not always convenient. And being a Christian sometimes involves trials and persecutions and difficulties that others in the world do not have. But you see, patience, longsuffering, this is the attitude in the heart of Jesus Christ that we must put on if we’re going to do whatever we do in the name of the Lord Jesus.

Look what he says further here in verse 13. Here he talks about bearing with one another, putting up with one another, enduring one another. You see, this is where we need to bring our patience, to our relationships in the body of Christ, his church. It’s not always easy for us to get along with each other in the church of Christ. You’ll find people from all different backgrounds. They speak different languages. They have different skin color. They’ve been brought up in a different environment. But God has brought us all together in the body of Christ so that we can learn to love one another and so that we can be united together in the work and the worship of the church. He not only says forbearing one another, but he says forgiving one another, if anyone has a complaint against another. Certainly we need to put forgiveness in our hearts, because there’s going to be times when we say things or we do things that are going to hurt one another. We may not mean to do that, we may not do that purposefully, but sometimes that’s going to happen. Oftentimes it’s just a misunderstanding. But whatever the case, we must be like Christ and have a forgiving heart towards one another.

You might say why should I forgive my brother?

Why should I put up with my brother?

Look at all of his weaknesses and his problems and his difficulties. I don’t know that I want to do that. But the reason is very clear at the end here of verse 13, Even as Christ forgave you, so you also must do. It’s because Christ has forgiven us. And if we realize that the almighty God in all of his holiness and righteousness is able then to forgive us, sinners, then certainly we ought to be able to forgive one another. And just as we have learned forgiveness and experienced that in our own life, having been forgiven by Christ, we ought to have a heart of forgiveness for all of those around us as well.

Then I want you to notice this last attribute of heart that Paul tells us to put on. Here he says in verse 14, “But above all these things, he says, put on love, which is the bond of perfection.”

Love is above all these other things. Love is continually emphasized in the Bible as the greatest of all things.

“Now abides faith, hope, and love, the Bible says; but the greatest of these is love,” 1 Corinthians 13:13.

And here you see how that Paul elevates this attribute of love. He says it’s the bond of perfection. It is that perfect bond that holds everything else together. It’s that super glue, it’s that Gorilla Glue.

In Texas, we’d say it’s the duct tape. That’s what we use to hold things together. But love is that which is able to cement our relationships. It’s because of love that we can be this kind of tender, merciful people, a people of compassion. It’s because of love that we can be kind and helpful to one another. It’s love that moves us here, as it says here, to be humble and to be meek and to be longsuffering, or patient with one another. It’s because of love that I can forbear my brother and I can forgive my brother. But without love, all of these things profit nothing.

That’s what Paul says in 1 Corinthians 13:1-3. “He says without love, I am nothing.”

Without love, if that’s not the motivation and the foundation and the glue that puts it all together, that moves us, that motivates us, we’re just a big fat spiritual zero with God. The fact is that this is a very comprehensive list of things that we must put in our hearts, that we must live in our lives. And it’s not any good if we can’t get them all together in love. You know, sometimes we dress up for church, we’ll put on our suit, we’ll put on our tie, we’ll put on our Sunday shoes, our Sunday socks, and we have on this clothing before we go into the worship of the service.

But what if I put on my fancy suit and then I wear my tennis shoes?

Or what if I were to put on my fancy suit, but I were to wear some ragged T-shirt?

That would stand out like a sore thumb because it doesn’t fit the dress. Now, I know in our day and time, we can pretty much get by with those things; but there was a time when that would stand out so obviously, and it would take away from the rest of the outfit. And think about it. As we are trying to do all things in the name of the Lord, whatever we do in the name of the Lord, he tells us here to put on these things.

What if we had humility and we were the most humble person in the world, but we had no patience?

Or what if, for example, we were compassionate, we had those tender mercies, but we weren’t forbearing, we weren’t forgiving?

You see, it takes all of these working together; otherwise, we’re going to mar the picture of Christ that we give to others.

Did you notice something about all of these characteristics that we’ve been studying here in Colossians chapter 3?

There’s something they all have in common. They all look just like Jesus. As you think about the ministry of Jesus upon the earth, you read about it in Matthew and Mark and Luke and in John, you see that this is Jesus, that tender, kind, helpful, patient, humble, meek, gentle person who was so forbearing, who was so forgiving that even on the cross he would say about his enemies, Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do. Surely we can see that the Lord Jesus Christ had a heart of love for all people, and this is why he went to the cross for us. That’s why he would leave the glories of heaven to become one of us, because he had that kind of love. And so you see, if we’re going to whatever we do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God through him, we’re going to put on the heart of Christ. We’re going to live the life of Jesus Christ; because when you do something in the name of somebody, you do it according to that person. You see, the name stands for the person. When you call the name Robert, you’re talking about me. When you’re talking about what Robert said or what Robert did, that means me. He’s talking about my person. And so it is to do something in the name of Jesus is to do it consistent with who he is, with his person, with his character. Some of you probably have a checking account. And your name is on that account. And when you sign a check, somebody can go cash it. Because your name’s on that check, they can get into your account and give that person money. Well, what happens when that check bounces? They don’t go after the person that cashed the check. They go after you, because your name is on that check. That name represents you. And so it is when the Bible tells us whatever we do, to do it all in the name of the Lord, we want to do it according to his person, according to who he is.

We want Jesus to be able to sign off on it. And listen, if Jesus Christ cannot sign off on what you’re doing, then you have no business doing it. If you’re involved with somebody you shouldn’t be involved with, that Jesus wouldn’t be involved with, then you have no business getting involved with that person. If you are involved in some kind of business investment, if you’re involved in some kind of recreation or entertainment or whatever it is that’s going on in your life, if that’s not consistent with who Jesus is, if Jesus wouldn’t be doing that, if Jesus wouldn’t be saying that, if Jesus wouldn’t be going there, then you don’t need to be; because you see, whatever you do in word or deed, he says, do all in the name of Jesus.

And look how this plays out, as you look back here at Colossians 3. Look at verse 15, where he says, “And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to which also you were called in one body; and be thankful.”

Did you notice what he talks about there in verse 15?

After he tells us to put on all these garments of Christ, he tells us of peace and of unity and of thankfulness, because, see, that’s what we bring to the body of Christ when we have a heart of Christ, when we live the life of Christ, a life consistent with the person of Jesus Christ. It brings peace to our hearts. It brings peace to our relationship with God and with one another. It brings us all together as one in the body of Jesus Christ, and our heart pours out with thanksgiving.

The Bible says in 1 Peter 2:21 that Christ is our example. I want to read this passage to you because I want you to see the very heart of who Jesus is so that we might take on his person in our life as well.

1 Peter 2, beginning in verse 21. “For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps: Who committed no sin, nor was deceit found in His mouth; who, when He was reviled, did not revile in return; when He suffered, He did not threaten, but committed Himself to Him who judges righteously; who Himself bore our sins in His own body on the tree, that we, having died to sins, might live for righteousness, by whose stripes you were healed.”

For you were like sheep going astray, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls. Yes, Jesus Christ suffered, leaving us an example. If you’re ever wondering about who Jesus is and how you ought to live your life, the kind of person you ought to be, you just go to the cross. You remember his suffering. You remember his sacrifice. You see, in order for Jesus to go there, to pay the price for our sins, he had to first live a perfect life, a life without sin, a life without guile. Oh, the honesty and the sincerity that we see in the life of Jesus. And it was that pure and innocent one that laid his life down for us, who made that sacrifice for us. Jesus did not come here and Jesus did not die for himself; he did all of that for us, to change our hearts and to change our lives.

Let me leave you with this passage in 2 Corinthians 3:18. Here the apostle Paul writes, “But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord.”

You see, as we continue to focus on Jesus Christ, as we look upon him closely, beholding his image as in a mirror, the mirror of God’s word, as we look in there and we study and we learn and we bring that into our heart and into our life, we become more and more like Christ, from one glory to another glory. Our heart, our lives are transformed; and that means all of those about us will also be transformed as we reflect the image of Christ to each one of them. Whatever you do, do all in the name of the Lord, giving thanks to God through Him. Now, we’re going to learn some other things that it means when it says to do all in the name of the Lord; but the first thing I want you to see today is that that means that I’m going to have a heart that is consistent with the heart of Jesus, I’m going to live a life that is consistent with the life of Jesus; and in doing that, I’m going to transform myself and all of those around us, and I’m going to bring glory and praise to the heavenly Father.

Isn’t that what you want to do?

Don’t you want Jesus Christ to be that transforming power in your heart and in your life?

The Bible says that that’s where our salvation is found. There’s no other name under heaven given among men whereby we must be saved, Acts 4:12. “Salvation is only found in Jesus Christ.”

I hope that if you don’t know him as your lord, as your savior, that you’ll let us know here at The Truth In Love how we can help you towards heaven today.

SINGING>> I know that my redeemer lives and ever prays for me.
I know eternal life he gives from sin and sorrow free.
I know, I know that my redeemer lives.
I know, I know eternal life he gives.
I know, I know that my redeemer lives.
I know that over yonder stands a place prepared for me,
a home, a house not made with hands,
most wonderful to see.
I know, I know that my redeemer lives.
I know, I know eternal life he gives.
I know, I know that my redeemer lives.

SINGING>> Unto the hills around do
I lift up my longing eyes.
Oh whence for me shall my salvation come,
from whence arise?
From God the Lord doth come my certain aid,
from God the Lord, whom heaven and earth hath made.
From every evil shall he keep thy soul,
from every sin.
Jehovah shall preserve thy going out,
thy coming in.
Above thee watching, he whom we adore shall keep thee henceforth,
yea, for evermore.

ROBERT >> I want to thank you so much for watching our program today. We would love to hear from you, and I want to encourage you to contact us with your questions and your comments, with your requests here at The Truth In Love, P.O. Box 865, Hurst, Texas 76053.

You may e-mail us at requests@ttil.tv.

Or call our toll-free number, 800-819-2966.

And also, please visit our web site at www.ttil.tv.

Remember that all our materials and services are absolutely free of charge. We just want to do what we can to help us all towards heaven. So let us know how we can help you, and please join us next time right here on The Truth In Love.

SINGING>> Sing to me of heaven, sing that song of peace.
From the toils that bind me it will bring release.
Burdens will be lifted that are pressing so,
showers of great blessing o’er my heart will flow.
Sing to me of heaven,
let me fondly dream of its golden glory,
of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall,
sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.
Sing to me of heaven tenderly and low
till the shadows o’er me rise and swiftly go.
When my heart is weary, when the day is long,
sing to me of heaven, sing that old, sweet song.
Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream of its golden glory,
of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall,
sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.

1570 Three Keys To Disciplining Children

Ever since Dr. Spock, parents have quit spanking kids. They said it’ll give them a warped psyche, make them violent; and yet it seems to me that today we have more messed-up, violent kids than ever before. They have no respect, they’re out of control, their parents do not know what to do with them. So what is a parent to do?

ROBERT >> How many of you have ever been spanked by your parents? Spanking used to be a general practice in our country. In fact, there was a time not too long ago that many parents brutally spanked their children to the point it brought great resentment to them. But that’s certainly not the case today. It seems the pendulum has swung all the way to the other side, so that now many parents would not dare lay a hand on their children. Ever since Dr. Spock, parents have quit spanking kids. They said it’ll give them a warped psyche, make them violent; and yet it seems to me that today we have more messed-up, violent kids than ever before. They have no respect, they’re out of control, their parents do not know what to do with them. So what is a parent to do? God tells us, if we’re willing to follow his instructions. And those instructions are found in the book of Proverbs.

SINGING>> Speaking the truth, speaking the truth,
speaking the truth, speaking the truth in love.

ROBERT >> Proverbs is a book of inspired wisdom, and it contains very valuable, good, and practical advice for living our lives. Several of the Proverbs address the matter of disciplining children. In fact, in Hebrews 12:5 and following, we see that God himself is a disciplinarian, that he chastens those whom he loves and reminds us of how we are subject to our fathers who correct us.

In Ephesians 6:4, we learn that fathers are not to provoke their children to wrath, but to bring them up in the chastening and admonition of the Lord. But I want you to know today that it’s not enough for us to know that we are to discipline our children; we must know how to do so properly. Much of the aversion to spanking is in reaction to those who have misused and abused it.

You see, not all discipline, not all spanking is effective. If misapplied, it can be very harmful. And so here are three helpful keys to disciplining children from the book of Proverbs that every parent needs to know. First of all, apply the rod of correction.

Look with me in Proverbs 22:15. “Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child; the rod of correction will drive it far from him.”

You see, children are full of foolishness. That’s obvious. Some of it’s innocent, some of it’s harmless; but some of it’s not so innocent, it’s not so harmless. Yes, we’ve got to allow children to be children; but we must train them to be well-disciplined children. Left to themselves, they’ll never learn better. And it’s not going to be easy to remove this foolishness from the heart of your child, because the scripture says it’s bound up there. It’s literally tied up there, in their heart. But there’s one thing that will drive it far from him. It is the rod of correction.

Now, there are some parents that want to substitute grounding or timeout; but the rod is an actual instrument that must be applied to the body of the child. And it is that rod that drives out the foolishness. The rod may come in a lot of different forms, like a small tree limb, a wispy branch. I remember the late gospel preacher Johnny Ramsey used to tell how his parents would use limbs off their peach tree and said that they never did have any peaches on that tree the whole time he was growing up. I don’t know about peach tree limbs, but I remember when I got in trouble and my mother would have me go out to the front yard and take a switch off our weeping willow. And that did sting. And so did my daddy’s skinny black belt that he used on me. In school, they would have wooden paddles that were used on the students. I don’t know if they still use those paddles or not. But that’s the rod. My wife, she’d grab a wooden spoon off the stove to swat our boys when they were growing up. Somehow those spoons kept disappearing. We found them a few years later behind the refrigerator when we moved out of that house. The rod is to be used as an instrument of correction, not abuse.

Notice he says that, “Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child; the rod of correction will drive it far from him.”

It’s a rod of correction. Sadly, parents have cruelly beaten their children mercilessly, causing bleeding and broken bones. And I know often parents will lash out dangerously at their children in anger, causing physical harm. Parents must not use the rod to take their frustrations out on their children, nor allow their anger to cause them to misuse the rod on their children. An abused child will suffer great trauma; but children will not resent being properly corrected, as the Bible teaches us. Children know the difference between being struck out of anger, frustration, or hatred to harm them and a loving parent who cares enough to teach them right from wrong and how to act and how to treat others. They know the difference between the two.

It’d be great, wouldn’t it, if you could just say to your little child, Sweetheart, now, don’t do that again. And they’d respond, Okay, Daddy, and then never, ever do it again?

That’d be wonderful, wouldn’t it?

But if you’ve been a parent for 30 seconds, you know that’s not happening. Most of the time, we tell them once and twice and three times, even more until we start saying the words, How many times have I told you?

This verse says it takes the rod of correction to get the job done. It doesn’t say have a nice talk with them and reason with them and give them a pillow so they can hit it and beat on it and get rid of their anger. It doesn’t say let them express themselves. It doesn’t say if they want to write on the walls or they want to scream at you or say how they feel about you, that’s okay. All that is a sack of humanist garbage.

This verse says foolishness must be driven out. It doesn’t say that foolishness goes out sweetly or nicely. You must drive it from them. That sounds to me like I’ve got to keep after them. It sounds to me like it’s not going to be easy. It sounds to me like you must confront them. It sounds to me like you must do this very seriously and intentionally. And that’d be right. Apply the rod of correction.

Now let me give you a second point from the Proverbs today about disciplining children.

Look back in Proverbs 13:24. Here it says, “He who spares his rod hates his son, but he who loves him disciplines him promptly.”

Yes, the Bible says to discipline promptly. And this verse stands in stark contrast to those who say I love my kids too much to spank them. No, this verse says, He who spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him disciplines him promptly. This verse says you hate your child if you don’t discipline them promptly.

In short, it means that you value your comfort: I don’t want to hear that child cry, I don’t want to hear that child complain if you spank them. And the result is a spoiled child who doesn’t listen. A parent does not love his child if he fails to apply the rod of correction when it’s needed. That word translated promptly, it actually carries the idea of jumping up and quickly taking care of it. Too many parents will not do this because they’re too busy, or maybe they’re too lazy, they don’t want to be disturbed. And so they wait and they put off the correction or not ever correct their child at all for what he’s done wrong. And it’s that kind of inconsistency that’s so confusing to a child. He never knows what to expect. But disciplining a child each time he needs it, if we’ll do that consistently and in a timely manner, then we’re going to teach him quickly what he’s doing wrong, and effectively correct his behavior. Too many parents give confusing signals, spanking sometimes and other times letting it go, so the children never know what to expect. Discipline is only meaningful and effective when it is consistent.

Look what it says in Proverbs the 23rd chapter. Notice verse 13 and verse 14. “Do not withhold correction from a child, for if you beat him with a rod, he will not die. You shall beat him with a rod, and deliver his soul from hell.”

Oh, your child might act like he’s getting murdered or something, and he’s screaming and he’s hollering when he’s getting a spanking, but that’s not the case. You’re not going to kill him. You’re keeping him from destroying his soul. I wonder just how many children will be lost in hell because their parents did not love them enough to discipline them promptly. I know it’s hard to discipline your children, look into those little eyes and see those big crocodile tears. It takes a great deal of love and courage. But it’ll save your child’s life. I want the children who are listening today to know it does hurt your parents when they must correct you. They don’t want to spank you. There’s no pleasure in it for them. And it’s true when loving parents say, This is going to hurt me a lot more than it hurts you. One child responded, I don’t want to put you through all that pain. Let’s change places. Believe me when I say they would change places with you if they could. But we can’t do that. It’s our responsibility as parents to bring you up in the chastening and admonition of the Lord. But let’s notice another Proverb here.

Notice Proverb 29:15. Here it says, “The rod and rebuke give wisdom, but a child left to himself brings shame to his mother.”

You see, it’s not enough for us to rebuke our children, though we must do that; but we must back it up with the rod. You’ve got to get their attention, or they’re going to end up getting their own kind of attention, and you’ll be embarrassed by them. Look at verse 17 of this same chapter. “Correct your son, and he will give you rest; yes, he will give delight to your soul.”

Parents, not only will prompt discipline save your children, it will relieve you of a great deal of distress and worry, and you’ll be able to feel good about your child. Instead of being ashamed, you’ll be proud of them.

How many parents live in grief over their children because they failed to discipline them promptly?

But still there is a third point that we need to remember today. Not only must we apply the rod of correction, but we must also discipline them promptly when they need it, consistently; but thirdly, we need to begin their training early on.

Read with me from Proverbs 19:18. “Chasten your son while there is hope, and do not set your heart on his destruction.”

Yes, here the Bible tells us to chasten our children when there’s hope, while there’s still time, before it’s too late. You know, kids are so smart. It seems to me that they’re getting smarter and smarter at a younger and a younger age. They learn so much before they ever start the first grade of school these days. Many parents are careful to teach them everything that they can as early as they can, it seems, except for how to act. They put off their discipline, thinking they’re too small to spank or they’re too young to really learn. But if you truly care about your children, don’t wait until they’re five years old to start disciplining. Even before they know words, they understand pain, and they’re able to learn what they can and cannot do. They touch a fire and it burns, and so they stay away from it. And when you spank your children, they learn to obey you. If your children are allowed to be disobedient when they’re small, it’ll be too late to train them later. If we’ll train them early on, then they’ll not need a whole lot of discipline later. They’ll be through testing you for the most part. If they learn to obey their parents, then it’ll be much easier and more likely that they’ll learn to obey their teachers and their employers and the law enforcement officials and their God. I wonder how many lives have been ruined because parents have waited too long to discipline their children.

I want you to know today that I’m thankful for parents that loved me, that loved me enough to spank me. They taught me to respect authority and to be obedient. They saved me from getting into a lot of trouble, and they helped me become a responsible person that’s held accountable for my actions. I love them for that. I don’t hate them. I’ve never been a violent person, and I don’t think I’ve turned out too warped in my thinking. But you know more than that, more than all that, I’m thankful for a God that loves me enough to discipline and to chasten me so that I might live a blessed life.

I want you to look with me in Hebrews the 12th chapter, and I want you to see how God, our heavenly Father, is a disciplinarian, that he disciplines us, too. And he gives an example for the fathers in our families today. But more than that, it helps us to understand how God loves us and how God cares for us.

In Hebrews the 12th chapter, the Hebrew writer is trying to encourage the first-century Christians in their trials and their difficulties, in their persecutions, to stay with Jesus Christ, to be faithful, to live for Christ and not turn back; and so he encourages them by reminding them of this exhortation.

Read with me Hebrews chapter 12 beginning at verse 5. ” And you have forgotten the exhortation which speaks to you as to sons: My son, do not despise the chastening of the Lord, nor be discouraged when you are rebuked by Him; for whom the Lord loves, He chastens, and scourges every son whom He receives.”

You see, this was something that was written before. Those of the Old Testament understood that God would discipline them, that he would chasten them, that he would scourge them. But they were not to be discouraged by that. And neither are we to be discouraged by that today. It means that God really does love us enough to correct us, to help us. He doesn’t just ignore us, but he’s doing what he can to make us into the kind of people we need to be. And so God in his love would chasten and scourge every son whom he received. Don’t be discouraged by that and don’t forget that.

Notice verse 7 of Hebrews 12. “If you endure chastening, God deals with you as with sons. For what son is there whom a father does not chasten? But if you are without chastening, of which all have become partakers, then you are illegitimate and not sons. Furthermore, we have human fathers who corrected us, and we paid them respect. Shall we not much more readily be in subjection to the Father of spirits and live?”

You see the connection between what we learn at home and how that affects our relationship with God later?

You see, if we understand that God loves us, and because of that we suffer in this life and we’re tried and we’re tested, God allows that to happen. But he’s able to use that for our good. He’s correcting us, he’s molding us, he’s shaping us. This is something we learned at home as little children when our fathers corrected us and we were in subjection to them. Look at it a little bit further here in this chapter.

Notice what he says here in verse 9. “Furthermore, we have had human fathers who corrected us, and we paid them respect. Shall we not much more readily be in subjection to the Father of spirits and live? For they indeed for a few days chastened us as seemed best to them, but He for our profit, that we may be partakers of His holiness.”

Now no chastening seems to be joyful for the present, but painful; nevertheless, afterward it yields the peaceable fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it. You see here in this passage that sometimes we as parents don’t always discipline our children properly. The most perfect parent is going to make mistakes from time to time. No matter how hard we try, we’re not going to be perfect in our discipline. But that’s not true with the father of our spirits, with our heavenly Father. God disciplines us, and it’s always for our benefit, for our profit, for our good, he says.

Notice he says here again in verse 11, “No chastening seems to be joyful for the present, but painful.”

Yes, life is difficult. It’s hard going through this testing and this trial of this life. We need to recognize that God is able to bring something good out of this. In fact, he uses these very things he says, Afterward it yields the peaceable fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it. Instead of becoming discouraged, instead of giving up and quitting, let’s remember that God loves us and that he corrects us and that he wants only the very best for us. It’s always for our good. It’s always for our profit. But most of all, I want you to know that Jesus Christ loves you so much that he would pay the price for your sins. Jesus Christ has done for us what we could not do for ourselves. He paid for our sins. We could never pay for them ourselves. In fact, long before he ever came into this world, Isaiah wrote about that.

Notice what it says in Isaiah 53:4-6. “Surely He has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet he we esteemed Him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted. Let me stop here for just a moment, because I want you to realize that when you look at the cross, we don’t understand sometimes why this happened to Jesus Christ, the Son of God.”

But we as Christians, we know that he did this for us, that he went through these things for us, that as he goes on to say here in verse 5, “He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; the chastisement of our peace was upon Him, and by His stripes we are healed.”

You see, the things that happened to Jesus were for us. It wasn’t for any crime he committed, but for our sins that he received this chastisement and these stripes, the discipline of God. Many times we don’t understand what God is doing with us. We don’t understand why things are happening the way they are in our lives. But understand that in everything God is working to bless our lives. It’s for our profit.

It’s for our good. As we read on here in Isaiah 53, notice in verse 6, “All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned, every one, to his own way; and the Lord has laid on Him the iniquity of us all.”

God does not only correct us as we seek to continue to try to go astray, but God provided for our forgiveness through the death of his son and that suffering there upon the cross for us. He was wounded, he was bruised, he was chastised, he was given stripes; but that’s what it cost to pay for our sins. And it’s because that payment has been made that we can be forgiven today. Our God loves us enough to correct us. And I hope that you’ll respond to that love, that you’ll respond to his correction, that you’ll get your heart, that you’ll get your life right with God today, that you’ll let us know here at The Truth In Love in how we can help you towards heaven.

singing>> On Zion’s glorious summit
stood a numerous host redeemed by blood.
They hymned their king in strains divine.
I heard the song and strove to join.
I heard the song and strove to join.
While everlasting ages roll, eternal love shall feast their soul;
and scenes of bliss forever new rise in succession to their view,
rise in succession to their view.
Holy, holy, holy Lord,
God of hosts on high adored.
Who like me thy praise should sing, oh almighty king?
Holy, holy, holy Lord,
God of hosts on high adored.
Holy, holy, holy.

ROBERT >> Thanks for watching the program today. We’d love to hear from you, so let me encourage you to contact us with your questions, comments, or requests at The Truth In Love, P.O. Box 865, Hurst, Texas 76053.

You may e-mail us at requests@ttil.tv.

Or call our toll-free number, 800-819-2966.

And also, please visit our web site at www.ttil.tv.

Remember, all our materials and services are absolutely free of charge. We just want to do what we can to help us all towards heaven. So let us know how we can help you, and please join us next time right here on The Truth In Love.

SINGING>> Sing to me of heaven, sing that song of peace.
From the toils that bind me it will bring release.
Burdens will be lifted that are pressing so,
showers of great blessing o’er my heart will flow.
Sing to me of heaven,
let me fondly dream of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall,
sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.
Sing to me of heaven tenderly and low
till the shadows o’er me rise and swiftly go.
When my heart is weary, when the day is long,
sing to me of heaven, sing that old, sweet song.
Sing to me of heaven, let me fondly dream
of its golden glory, of its pearly gleam.
Sing to me when shadows of the evening fall,
sing to me of heaven, sing the sweetest song of all.